HID Global statement on IOActive withdrawing their Black Hat presentation
Posted on 28 February 2007.
In response to IOActive’s press release entitled “IOActive Withdraws Black Hat Presentation to Allow ACLU to Present”, HID Global would like to state the following:

HID Global did not threaten IOActive or Chris Paget, its Director of Research and Development, to stop its presentation at the Black Hat event being held in Washington, DC on Wednesday, February 28, 2007. HID Global, acting in the best interests of its customers worldwide, simply informed IOActive and its management of the patents that currently protect HID Global intellectual property.

As with any company’s legal rights under patent laws, HID Global reminded IOActive about the intellectual property protection provided by these patents. HID Global has the right and responsibility to discourage the publication of any information regarding the improper use of HID’s intellectual property, including violations of HID’s intellectual property or inducing others to violate HID’s intellectual property.

Under no circumstance has HID asked IOActive or Mr. Paget to cancel their presentation. In fact, we were surprised by their decision to cancel the presentation and to attribute the cancellation to a threat from HID. This was not, and never was, HID’s position.

We understand and acknowledge that it may be possible, under certain conditions, to clone a proximity card. HID Global offers customers a wide array of card and reader solutions that are simply one piece of an overall security system. To clarify, a facility’s overall security system most often encompasses a combination of components (i.e. CCTV, access control, biometrics, readers, and credentials) that help secure a building or facility.

HID Global remains committed to its customers, to its products, and to the range of security solutions we will continue to offer to our customers based on their particular security needs.


Pen-testing drone searches for unsecured devices

You're sitting in an office, and you send a print job to the main office printer. You see or hear a drone flying outside your window. Next thing you know, the printer buzzes to life and, after spitting out your print job, it continues to work and presents you with more filled pages than you expected.

Weekly newsletter

Reading our newsletter every Monday will keep you up-to-date with security news.

Daily digest

Receive a daily digest of the latest security news.

Fri, Oct 9th