It takes 10 hours to identify a security breach
Posted on 17 June 2013.
Businesses are vulnerable to security breaches due to their inability to properly analyze or store big data, according to McAfee.

The ability to detect data breaches within minutes is critical in preventing data loss, yet only 35 percent of firms stated that they have the ability to do this. In fact, more than a fifth (22 percent) said they would need a day to identify a breach, and five percent said this process would take up to a week. On average, organizations reported that it takes 10 hours for a security breach to be recognized.


“If you’re in a fight, you need to know that while it’s happening, not after the fact,” said Mike Fey, executive VP and worldwide CTO. “This study has shown what we’ve long suspected -- that far too few organisations have real-time access to the simple question ‘am I being breached?’ Only by knowing this, can you stop it from happening.”

Nearly three quarters (73 percent) of respondents claimed they can assess their security status in real-time and they also responded with confidence in their ability to identify in real-time insider threat detection (74 percent), perimeter threats (78 percent), zero day malware (72 percent) and compliance controls (80 percent).

However, of the 58 percent of organisations that said they had suffered a security breach in the last year, just a quarter (24 percent) had recognised it within minutes. In addition, when it came to actually finding the source of the breach, only 14 percent could do so in minutes, while 33 percent said it took a day and 16 percent said a week.

This false confidence highlights a disconnect between the IT department and security professionals within organisations, which is further highlighted when the Needle in a Datastack findings are compared with the with a recent Data Breach Investigations report of security incidents.

The study of 855 incidents showed that 63 percent took weeks or months to be discovered. The data was taken from these organizations within seconds or minutes in almost half (46 percent) of the cases.

On average that organisations are storing approximately 11-15 terabytes of security data a week, a figure that Gartner Group predicts will double annually through 2016. To put that in perspective, 10 terabytes is the equivalent of the printed collection of the Library of Congress.

Despite storing such large volumes of data, 58 percent of firms admitted to only holding on to it for less than three months, thereby negating many of the advantages of storing it in the first place.

According to the McAfee Threats Report: Fourth Quarter 2012, the appearance of new APTs accelerated in the second half of 2012. This type of threat can lay dormant within a network for months or even years, with numerous recent high profile examples including attacks on major U.S. newspapers. Long term retention and analysis of security data to reveal patterns, trends and correlations is crucial if organizations are to spot and deal quickly with these APTs.





Spotlight

How to talk infosec with kids

Posted on 17 September 2014.  |  It's never too early to talk infosec with kids: you simply need the right story. In fact, as cyber professionals it’s our duty to teach ALL the kids in our life about technology. If we are to make an impact, we must remember that children needed to be taught about technology on their terms.


Weekly newsletter

Reading our newsletter every Monday will keep you up-to-date with security news.
  



Daily digest

Receive a daily digest of the latest security news.
  

DON'T
MISS

Fri, Sep 19th
    COPYRIGHT 1998-2014 BY HELP NET SECURITY.   // READ OUR PRIVACY POLICY // ABOUT US // ADVERTISE //