Dell unveils new enterprise vision
Posted on 19 October 2012.
Dell announced plans to help businesses globally adopt modern, standards-based data center technologies that enable them to realize repeatable results and superior value at every scale. To do this Dell utilizes a standards-based architecture that optimizes the use of IT resources, anticipates growth, and supports future expansion.


The enterprise strategy brings together hardware, software and services developed by Dell and gained through acquisitions under a common design philosophy to offer customers a data center infrastructure.

The company also announced its next wave of converged infrastructure offerings, Active Systems, that provide a foundation for application, virtual desktop infrastructure and private cloud deployments.

Dell’s new converged infrastructure family, called Active Infrastructure, helps IT organizations more rapidly respond to business demands, improve data center efficiency, and strengthen IT service quality. It is ideal for businesses that are standardizing on x86 server architectures and need a more dynamic infrastructure operated in a simplified and automated fashion.

Dell also offers optimized and validated Active Solutions for private clouds, virtual desktop infrastructure, and enterprise applications such as Microsoft Lync, Exchange and Sharepoint 2010.

Part of the Active Infrastructure family, the new Dell Active System offers an intuitive, highly flexible, and comprehensive approach to converged infrastructure. Central to all Active Systems is the new Active System Manager, an intuitive tool for the most common infrastructure administrative tasks. It delivers substantial operational benefits such as helping to eliminate up to 75% of steps needed for “power on to production.”

Dell is also introducing the pre-integrated Active System 800, a blade-based model that includes EqualLogic storage and Force10 networking and is designed for highly virtualized environments with applications that demand performance, agility and scalability.





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