Stalking the wild Wi-Fi network

Monday, 3 January 2005, 3:21 PM EST

With San Francisco's world-famous Lombard Street -- the so-called curviest street in the world -- a block away and Alcatraz resplendent in the glow of a late afternoon sun, it was only natural that one of the nearest available Wi-Fi networks was named "Rice-a-Roni."

Until recently, intrepid wireless internet hunters would never have known the name of any of the myriad 802.11 signals pouring from these tony apartment buildings without opening their laptops. That's because none of handheld devices on the market that indicate the presence and strength of available Wi-Fi signals could detect network names.

By Daniel Terdiman at Wired.

[ Read more ]

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