How to develop .NET security code as a non-admin

Monday, 22 November 2004, 12:10 AM EST

The trick to developing code in a nonprivileged environment is to have your main interactive logon be nonprivileged but to keep an admin logon in your pocket for those times that you need it. Look, it doesn't take administrative privileges to edit a text file, and that's what you're doing most of the time when you're programming, right? And you don't want your programs to require admin privileges to run, which is the point of this whole exercise. So your main logon, where you write, compile, link, and test your code (and where you surf the Internet, of course) should be nonprivileged. However, during development you will occasionally need to create a virtual directory in IIS, add a user account, or add an assembly to the global assembly cache, and that's where your secondary logon comes in handy.

By Keith Brown at InformIT.

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