Setting up a software restriction and wireless network policy with Windows 2003 group policy

Tuesday, 17 August 2004, 12:46 PM EST

To conceptually explain a group policy, think of a policy as a group of settings. Groups of policies are commonly referred to as Group Policy Objects, or GPOs. You could have one or several GPOs for users and computers on your network. In most situations, there will be more than one GPO because different user or computer groups usually need different restrictions or allowances. For example, you could have one GPO that sets some security settings globally for all users on your network, whereas another GPO could set Desktop restrictions, which would be applicable only to a particular user or computer group on your network. These GPOs would in effect be applied at the domain level, thus propagating and overriding any local machine policies on your network when a user who has these GPOs assigned to them logs into said machine.

By Jesse Smith at InformIT.

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