Rescuing Linux Systems

Tuesday, 9 July 2002, 12:45 PM EST

The time comes when every Linux system administrator experiences a system failure. Hardware failures are usually resolved quickly enough by replacing a deceased motherboard, power supply, or controller, but component failure can have other side effects, especially in disk subsystems where errant or incomplete writes may corrupt boot information and filesystems. The true twilight zone for system administrators occurs when an otherwise useful system is unbootable due to disk corruption or accidental system misconfiguration--your data is just a few inches away, but is inaccessible for one reason or another.



The easiest solution to this sort of problem is a bootable disk known as a "rescue disk," located on removable media such as a floppy disk or CD. These are designed to help you boot failed systems, resolve or work around common problems, and quickly restore your system to self-sufficiency.

[ Read more ]




Spotlight

Whitepaper: Zero Trust approach to network security

Posted on 20 November 2014.  |  Zero Trust is an alternative security model that addresses the shortcomings of failing perimeter-centric strategies by removing the assumption of trust.


Weekly newsletter

Reading our newsletter every Monday will keep you up-to-date with security news.
  



Daily digest

Receive a daily digest of the latest security news.
  

DON'T
MISS

Mon, Nov 24th
    COPYRIGHT 1998-2014 BY HELP NET SECURITY.   // READ OUR PRIVACY POLICY // ABOUT US // ADVERTISE //