Recognition keys access

Monday, 7 June 2004, 4:27 AM EST

Passwords are a problem. To be secure, a password must be non-obvious and changed often. Given the number of passwords the average person uses, and given the difficulty of keeping non-obvious and constantly changing passwords straight, it's not surprising that many people don't like them.

Researchers from Hebrew University in Israel are addressing the problem with a scheme that allows people to use a type of password that they don't have to consciously remember.

The scheme taps the way people learn through the instinctive imprinting process. When a person learns information via imprinting, he can recognize the information later but can't recall it in a way he can describe to someone else.

By Kimberly Patch at TRN.

[ Read more ]

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