Secure transactions with no strings attached

Monday, 15 September 2003, 12:34 PM EST

Public-key infrastructure technology was once so cool. Its combination of encryption, digital certificates and other technologies appeared to be a foolproof way to ensure the security of electronic transactions. It gave agencies the tools they needed to replace paper documents with electronic ones and paved the way for electronic government.

Sometimes, though, when organizations look more closely at deploying PKI, the technology loses its allure. Instead of finding a universal remedy, many agencies have become mired in the taxing policy and technical issues that come with PKI. Encryption techniques rely on randomly generated keys that must be mapped to user identities using digitally signed documents called certificates. Managing those certificates ó developing policies and processes to issue and revoke them efficiently ó is an enormously complex and expensive task that has hampered many agency efforts to build their own PKIs.

[ Read more ]

Related items




Spotlight

Hackers indicted for stealing Apache helicopter training software

Posted on 1 October 2014.  |  Members of a computer hacking ring have been charged with breaking into computer networks of prominent technology companies and the US Army and stealing more than $100 million in intellectual property and other proprietary data.


Weekly newsletter

Reading our newsletter every Monday will keep you up-to-date with security news.
  



Daily digest

Receive a daily digest of the latest security news.
  

DON'T
MISS

Thu, Oct 2nd
    COPYRIGHT 1998-2014 BY HELP NET SECURITY.   // READ OUR PRIVACY POLICY // ABOUT US // ADVERTISE //