Pocket Wi-Fi sniffers end missing hotspot misery

Tuesday, 19 August 2003, 3:39 PM EST

Road warriors know the frustration: you're in a foreign city and want to find a Wi-Fi access point. Normally that means looking on the Internet for site directories that can tell you where the nearest hotspots are located, such as WiFinder or WiFiMaps. Most of the time, it's trial and error.

Now, there is a much easier solution. US peripherals maker Kensington has introduced worlds first: a detector that will locate Wi-Fi networks. No more booting up your notebook to find a Wi-Fi signal.

The small device detects 802.11b and 802.11g signals from up to 200 feet away and filters out other wireless signals, including cordless phones, microwave ovens and Bluetooth networks. Three lights indicate signal strength. For $29.95 that's seems a bargain.

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