Hackers, software companies feud over disclosure of weaknesses

Tuesday, 15 July 2003, 7:26 AM EST

As Muhammad Faisal Rauf Danka recalls it, he tried 10 times to call a software maker about a devastating security flaw in one of its most popular programs.

"It is so simple it is funny," the Pakistani researcher says. But nothing happened. Then he took his findings to a global audience — a worldwide mailing list devoted to exposing and exploring software bugs.

Vindication came swiftly: Within days, Microsoft acknowledged that 200 million of its Passport accounts had been left open, apparently for months, allowing the easy hijacking of credit-card and other personal data. The company shut down the Passport system and fixed the hole.

To some, Danka is a hero for publicly prodding a big company into swiftly correcting an error. But to Microsoft, he is an "information anarchist" who makes it easier for malicious hackers to inflict havoc on the masses.

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