The feds love Linux

Monday, 23 June 2003, 12:31 PM EST

Three weeks ago, John P. Stenbit, chief information officer of the U.S. Department of Defense, issued an agencywide memo that has Linux lovers rejoicing. The brief outlined the DOD's policy on acquiring, using and developing open-source software, including the Linux operating system. By creating an official policy, the DOD is "outing" open source, a technology that was stuck in government limbo, neither condoned nor outlawed.

"People used to think they'd get fired if they talked about it. It was 'Don't ask, don't tell,'" says Tony M. Stanco, founding director of the Center of Open Source & Government, a policy think tank. "But now that the DOD has legitimized open source, people won't be afraid to come out and say that they use it."

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