Quantum cryptography stretches 100 kilometres

Friday, 6 June 2003, 1:06 AM EST

Communications protected with the complete security of quantum cryptography are now possible over an ordinary 100-kilometre fibre optic cable, thanks to sophisticated photon detection equipment developed by UK researchers.

A team from Toshiba Research Europe, based in Cambridge, UK, has developed a quantum photon detector capable of significantly reducing the amount of random noise picked up as the super-secure cryptographic keys are generated. This boosts the fibre optic distance over which quantum cryptography is feasible.

Quantum cryptography guarantees secure communications by harnessing the quantum quirks of photons sent between users. Any attempt to intercept the photons will disturb their quantum state and, because this quantum quality is an integral part of key generation, the disturbance with immediately raise the alarm.

But reducing the amount of random noise picked up by a detector at either end of a fibre link is crucial. If the noise level is too high, the key generation process will fail too many times to be practical. Until now, no device has been able to make it work across such a long optical link.

[ Read more ]

Related items




Spotlight

The evolution of backup and disaster recovery

Posted on 25 July 2014.  |  Amanda Strassle, IT Senior Director of Data Center Service Delivery at Seagate Technology, talks about enterprise backup issues, illustrates how the cloud shaping an IT department's approach to backup and disaster recovery, and more.


Weekly newsletter

Reading our newsletter every Monday will keep you up-to-date with security news.
  



Daily digest

Receive a daily digest of the latest security news.
  

DON'T
MISS

Mon, Jul 28th
    COPYRIGHT 1998-2014 BY HELP NET SECURITY.   // READ OUR PRIVACY POLICY // ABOUT US // ADVERTISE //