Software tweak may make operating systems safer

Monday, 14 April 2003, 12:34 PM EST

The OpenBSD project hopes new changes to its latest release will eliminate "buffer overflows", a software issue that has been plaguing security experts for more than three decades.

Theo de Raadt, the project leader for the group, believes that the group's latest improvements to the Unix variant, due to be released on 1 May, will make causing a buffer overflow extremely difficult, if not impossible. A buffer overflow is a memory error in software that allows an attacker to run a malicious program.

"I could say that I am killing buffer overflows, but I am in the security community, so I have to put it in quotes," he told attendees at the CanSecWest security show on Thursday.

The memory bugs have resisted extermination for almost 30 years, and de Raadt said that any claims that an open-source group has done so would need to be tested.

[ Read more ]




Spotlight

Patching: The least understood line of defense

Posted on 29 August 2014.  |  How many end users, indeed how many IT pros, truly get patching? Sure, many of us see Windows install updates when we shut down our PC and think all is well. Itís not.


Weekly newsletter

Reading our newsletter every Monday will keep you up-to-date with security news.
  



Daily digest

Receive a daily digest of the latest security news.
  

DON'T
MISS

Tue, Sep 2nd
    COPYRIGHT 1998-2014 BY HELP NET SECURITY.   // READ OUR PRIVACY POLICY // ABOUT US // ADVERTISE //