How to use a personal DNS for root-server attack isolation

Monday, 17 February 2003, 2:40 AM EST

Provided a couple of programmers are correct, what started out as an attempt to provide better Domain Name System (DNS) server performance on Windows machines may also be one way to reduce DNS security concerns.
Surprisingly enough, the project is centered on a specially configured derivative of BIND 9.2 (Berkeley Internet Name Domain) localized to the user's machine. This localized DNS -- called BIND-PE and available on NTCanuck.com -- was initially announced on Gibson Research Corp.'s (GRC) news server, news.grc.com, in a newsgroup related to GRC's Domain Name System Research Utility (DNSRU), which was designed to test the DNS system's performance and expiration rates.

The BIND server is the most frequently used name server on the Internet and provides the mechanism that translates domain names to Internet Protocol addresses for Web browsers and other Internet applications. Ordinarily, an Internet service provider (ISP) provides several name servers for its customers' use. BIND-PE, however, provides an ISP-independent DNS that runs directly on users' computers.

[ Read more ]




Spotlight

Operation Pawn Storm: Varied targets and attack vectors, next-level spear-phishing tactics

Posted on 23 October 2014.  |  Targets of the spear phishing emails included staff at the Ministry of Defense in France, in the Vatican Embassy in Iraq, military officials from a number of countries, and more.


Weekly newsletter

Reading our newsletter every Monday will keep you up-to-date with security news.
  



Daily digest

Receive a daily digest of the latest security news.
  

DON'T
MISS

Fri, Oct 24th
    COPYRIGHT 1998-2014 BY HELP NET SECURITY.   // READ OUR PRIVACY POLICY // ABOUT US // ADVERTISE //