Ksplice: kernel patches without reboots

Monday, 12 May 2008, 1:59 PM EST

The kernel developers are generally quite good about responding to security problems. Once a vulnerability in the kernel has been found, a patch comes out in short order; system administrators can then apply the patch (or get a patched kernel from their distributor), reboot the system, and get on with life knowing that the vulnerability has been fixed. It is a system which works pretty well.

One little problem remains, though: rebooting the system is a pain. At a minimum, it requires a few minutes of down time. With ksplice, system administrators can have the best of both worlds: security fixes without unsightly reboots.

At LWN.

[ Read more ]




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