‘Back-hacker’ says Sandia tried to keep probe of breach quiet

Tuesday, 6 March 2007, 12:00 AM EST

Last month, a jury in New Mexico awarded Shawn Carpenter $4.3 million as part of a wrongful termination lawsuit against Sandia National Laboratories, where he had worked as a network intrusion- detection analyst. Carpenter was fired in early 2005 after he shared information about a network compromise with the FBI and the U.S. Army. Sandia, which is run by a subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corp. under a contract with the U.S. Department of Energy, claimed that Carpenter had inappropriately disclosed confidential information. But Carpenter said he did so for national security reasons after using reverse-hacking techniques to find evidence that the perpetrators of the May 2004 breach at Sandia belonged to a Chinese hacking group called Titan Rain.

At Computerworld.

[ Read more ]




Spotlight

USBdriveby: Compromising computers with a $20 microcontroller

Posted on 19 December 2014.  |  Security researcher Samy Kamkar has devised a fast and easy way to compromise an unlocked computer and open a backdoor on it: a simple and cheap ($20) pre-programmed Teensy microcontroller.


Weekly newsletter

Reading our newsletter every Monday will keep you up-to-date with security news.
  



Daily digest

Receive a daily digest of the latest security news.
  
DON'T
MISS

Fri, Dec 19th
    COPYRIGHT 1998-2014 BY HELP NET SECURITY.   // READ OUR PRIVACY POLICY // ABOUT US // ADVERTISE //