Princeton professor finds no hardware security in E-voting machine

Monday, 19 February 2007, 12:45 AM EST

A Princeton University computer science professor who bought several Sequoia electronic voting machines off the Internet claims he found no hardware security to prevent someone from accessing the technology that controls the vote counting.

Andrew Appel said Friday there was nothing in the five Sequoia AVC Advantage machines he bought for $82 that would stop him from reaching the read-only memory (ROM) chips that hold the program instructions for counting votes. The chips were not soldered to the circuit boards, and could be easily removed with a screwdriver and replaced with other chips.

At the EE Times.

[ Read more ]




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Using Hollywood to improve your security program

Posted on 29 July 2014.  |  Tripwire CTO Dwayne Melancon spends a lot of time on airplanes, and ends up watching a lot of movies. Some of his favorite movies are adventures, spy stuff, and cunning heist movies. A lot of these movies provide great lessons that we can apply to information security.


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