Princeton professor finds no hardware security in E-voting machine

Monday, 19 February 2007, 12:45 AM EST

A Princeton University computer science professor who bought several Sequoia electronic voting machines off the Internet claims he found no hardware security to prevent someone from accessing the technology that controls the vote counting.

Andrew Appel said Friday there was nothing in the five Sequoia AVC Advantage machines he bought for $82 that would stop him from reaching the read-only memory (ROM) chips that hold the program instructions for counting votes. The chips were not soldered to the circuit boards, and could be easily removed with a screwdriver and replaced with other chips.

At the EE Times.

[ Read more ]




Spotlight

USBdriveby: Compromising computers with a $20 microcontroller

Posted on 19 December 2014.  |  Security researcher Samy Kamkar has devised a fast and easy way to compromise an unlocked computer and open a backdoor on it: a simple and cheap ($20) pre-programmed Teensy microcontroller.


Weekly newsletter

Reading our newsletter every Monday will keep you up-to-date with security news.
  



Daily digest

Receive a daily digest of the latest security news.
  
DON'T
MISS

Fri, Dec 19th
    COPYRIGHT 1998-2014 BY HELP NET SECURITY.   // READ OUR PRIVACY POLICY // ABOUT US // ADVERTISE //