hacked, serving malware
Posted on 26.09.2011 has been hacked and is currently serving malware, Armorize warns.

The company has detected the compromise through its website malware monitoring platform HackAlert, and has analyzed how the compromise of the site's visitors unfolds.

The website is injected with a script that generates an iFrame that redirects the visitors to, where the BlackHole exploit pack is hosted.

"It exploits the visitor's browsing platform (the browser, the browser plugins like Adobe Flash, Adobe PDF, etc, Java, ...), and upon successful exploitation, permanently installs a piece of malware into the visitor's machine, without the visitor's knowledge," say the researchers. "The visitor doesn't need to click or agree to anything; simply visiting with a vulnerable browsing platform will result in an infection."

What type of malware is served is still unknown, but the worrying thing is that currently only 9 percent of the AV solutions used by VirusTotal block it.

It is, of course, impossible to say who the attackers are. The domain reached through the iFrame is registered to one Christopher J Klein from Miami and is located in Berlin, Germany. The domain serving the exploit and the malware is located in Stockholm, Sweden.

The administrators of the domain are being contacted, but the site is still up and compromised, say the researchers.

According to Sucuri Security researchers, the site has been compromised via JavaScript malware that "infects a web site through a compromised desktop (with virus), where it steals any stored password from the FTP client and uses that to attack the site."

Trend Micro researchers add that they have recently discovered a denizen of a Russian underground forum selling root access to some of the cluster servers of and its subdomains, asking at least $3,000 for each access, and that they have notified administrators of their discovery a week ago.


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