Lessons learned from cracking 2 million LinkedIn passwords
by Francois Pesce - Principal Engineer at Qualys - Monday, 11 June 2012.
The author of John the Ripper, Solar Designer, did a great presentation on the past, present and future of password security. Although the security industry has put a lot of work into making good hash functions (and there's still more work to do), I believe that poorly chosen passwords are a concern. Maybe we should demand that our browsers (using secured storage as in Firefox Manager) or 3rd-party single-sign-on providers create easier solutions to help us resist the temptation of using simple passwords and re-using the same passwords with simple variations.

Note: The hashes in the 120MB file sometimes had their five first characters rewritten with 0. If we look at the 6th to 40th characters, we can even find duplicates of these substrings in the file meaning the first five characters have been used for some unknown purpose: is it LinkedIn that stores user information here? is it the initial attacker that tagged a set of account to compromise? This is unknown.

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